John J. Kelly, DDS Your Smile | Your Health Sun, Nov 28, 2021
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5350 West Devon Av
Chicago, IL 60646
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FOR GREAT SMILES!

Call us today at  
773-631-6844
 

EASY TO FIND!

5350 West Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Get details!

Mostly Cloudy

32°F

0°C

FOR GREAT SMILES

Request a visit online or
Call 773.631.6844
Do it today!

WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

5350 W. Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Dental office details!

IN THIS ISSUE

Why Is My Dentist Suggesting A Bone Graft?

Why Is My Dentist Suggesting A Bone Graft?

Although most people with missing teeth qualify for dental implant surgery, some will need a procedure called a bone graft before the dentist can start the implant process. Find out more about this relatively quick and minimally invasive procedure in case you need one.

read more
Why Is My Dentist Suggesting A Bone Graft?

Why Is My Dentist Suggesting A Bone Graft?

Although most people with missing teeth qualify for dental implant surgery, some will need a procedure called a bone graft before the dentist can start the implant process. Find out more about this relatively quick and minimally invasive procedure in case you need one.

read more
Extra! The Latest Dental News You Can Use!

Extra! The Latest Dental News You Can Use!

An advice columnist is asked what to do when a beloved boyfriend refuses to replace his missing front teeth … scientists discover a way to predict mental illness from baby teeth … plus, how bulimia and diabetes can be a blow to your oral health.

read more
Extra! The Latest Dental News You Can Use!

Extra! The Latest Dental News You Can Use!

An advice columnist is asked what to do when a beloved boyfriend refuses to replace his missing front teeth … scientists discover a way to predict mental illness from baby teeth … plus, how bulimia and diabetes can be a blow to your oral health.

read more

our little video

More Good Stuff

Why Tongue-Cleaning Is No Gag!

Why Tongue-Cleaning Is No Gag!

So you brush, you floss and you see your dentist every six months – you think you’re on your best behavior for protecting your teeth but …

Consider the other part of your mouth that could cause trouble if you don’t also keep it clean. We’re speaking of the part known as your tongue. Keeping this kindly beast clean can actually help you stay healthier and fresher smelling (in your mouth, that is) over the long haul.

Why it’s good to clean your tongue

1. The tongue’s important — its surface is like the surface of, say, a coral reef – filled with small tubers (in the case of the tongue, they’re called papillae) that give you the sense of taste and texture when you eat or drink or put something you shouldn’t into your mouth.

2. Bad bacteria afoot — The tongue can foster a goodly number of bacteria. Granted, not all bacteria in the body is bad for you (in fact, most are good) but certain bacteria species can lead to tooth decay, gum infections and bad breath (halitosis). Plaque is a form of this, as you probably know, which creates a biofilm that coats your teeth, leading to cavities.

3. Flotsam — On top of this, the tongue often carries food residue and dead cells that can wreak havoc in your mouth, if not removed. Properly cleaning your tongue will prevent much of this trouble and keep your mouth healthy (and healthy-smelling!). Indeed, research shows that cleaning the tongue can clear bacteria and improve bad breath more than brushing alone.

4. Good taste — Research indicates that cleaning your tongue can actually improve your sense of taste. When you scrape or clean the surface of the tongue, it’s almost the same as starting with a whole new palette! After properly cleaning your tongue for a couple of weeks, see if you’ll notice stronger flavors the next time you eat!

5. Bigger problems — Cleaning your tongue gives you an opportunity to examine it for signs of something wrong – if you see a white, black or red discoloration – or ongoing sores, wounds or pain, make an appointment and consult your dentist (us) for further investigation – don’t let it go for too long!

Cleaning your tongue the right way

Now if the idea of reaching in there and cleaning/scraping your tongue makes you want to gag, don’t worry – it’s not as uncomfortable as you might think, especially as you get used to it — trust us, the benefits outweigh the time and effort.

Method 1 – Brushing – So you brush your teeth twice a day, do you? While you’re at it, use your trusty toothbrush to gently clean your tongue with a small dab of toothpaste. It’s like you’re cleaning your carpet – only a lot more often (and a lot smaller area than a carpet).

 Method 2 – Tongue Scraping – Tongue scrapers are made of plastic, copper or stainless steel and are available at most pharmacies, usually for under $10.

Brush your teeth, floss and rinse as usual. Then, stick out your tongue and gently press and hold the scraper once or twice along the entire surface, starting at the back of the tongue and scraping forward. Apply enough pressure as you see fit to get it to work. After each pass, rinse the scraper with warm water and then rinse your mouth with water. Ahhh…

A Clean Scrape

Tongue scraping or tongue brushing just might be the answer to problems like bad breath, cavity prevention, gum disease prevention — plus, it will make you more aware of what’s going on inside your mouth.

If you want further advice on cleaning your tongue, ask us!

Secrets To Longer-Lived Smiles

Secrets To Longer-Lived Smiles

Healthy teeth are important for a healthy life, as studies have linked poor oral health with heart disease and other serious health problems.

Most people know the importance of reducing their sugar intake to maintain healthy teeth, but it’s also essential to have a good oral health routine. Here are a few suggestions that you can follow, and also discuss with your dentist.

Use the Right Brushing Technique

Of course, brushing your teeth twice a day removes most of the plaque before it damages your teeth, but using the right brushing technique can also make a huge difference. Experts recommend setting a timer for two minutes, as this is how long it should take to clean your teeth effectively.

Dentists and other professionals advocate a variety of brushing techniques, but as a starting point, hold your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle, as this helps to clean under the gum line. Use small circular motions over the front, back and chewing surfaces to help reach all areas of your teeth.

Apply gentle pressure – avoid scrubbing too hard, as this can damage your tooth enamel and gums. Apply a little extra pressure when cleaning the chewing surfaces of your teeth, as these often contain crevices where food particles get stuck.

Choose the Right Tools

Manual and electric toothbrushes can be equally effective for keeping your teeth healthy, although electric toothbrushes can make the brushing process quicker and easier. Choosing the right head is more important than the type of toothbrush you use.

Look for soft or medium bristles rather than hard ones, as hard bristles can damage teeth and gums, sometimes leading to infection.

Choose a toothbrush with a head that is small enough to reach right to the back of your mouth.

Clean Inter-Dental Spaces

Food debris, plaque and bacteria can all gather and become trapped between the teeth. Cleaning between the teeth at least once a day is essential for good oral health. You can use inter-dental brushes, floss or floss picks (sometimes known as flossers or floss harps) to clean inter-dental spaces.

When using floss or floss picks, it’s important to angle the floss so it wraps around the edges of the tooth. Use a gentle up and down motion to dislodge plaque from the tooth. Make sure to floss under your gum line, as this is where bacteria and plaque can thrive.

If you prefer to use inter dental brushes, use a back and forth motion around your gum line and remember to clean the brushes thoroughly after use. There are also other options, such as water flossing, for cleaning inter dental spaces, but they may not be suitable for everyone. Experiment with different techniques to find the right option for cleaning between your teeth.

Don’t Forget Your Tongue

The surface of the tongue is an ideal place for bacteria to thrive as it’s full of crevices and cracks where food particles and bacteria can hide. Bacteria on the tongue is also one of the most common causes of bad breath. Cleaning your tongue every day is just as important as brushing your teeth. Many toothbrushes include a tongue cleaner on the back of the brush, but you can also use a tongue scraper, or even the bristles of your toothbrush.

Whatever you use to clean your tongue, it’s important to start at the back of your mouth and work forward in long strokes. Never start at the front of your tongue, as you risk pushing bacteria further back. Apply firm but gentle pressure to scrape bacteria from the back of your tongue and out of your mouth. If your tongue hurts or bleeds after cleaning, you are using too much pressure.

Avoid Alcohol-Based Mouthwash

Alcohol reduces the amount of saliva produced in the mouth, which can leave your teeth more vulnerable to plaque. If you use mouthwash regularly, check the ingredients, as many popular mouthwashes contain alcohol.

Most people don’t need to use mouthwash, but if you like the fresh feeling of a minty rinse, opt for one that’s alcohol-free. In addition, avoid using mouthwash straight after brushing, as it will wash away the fluoride protection of your toothpaste.

Protect Your Teeth While You Sleep

Saliva performs an important role in helping to neutralize and control bacteria in the mouth. However, saliva production is reduced while you’re asleep, making it easier for harmful bacteria to thrive. Fluoride toothpaste can help by providing your teeth and gums with a protective coating.

Brushing your teeth last thing at night with a fluoride toothpaste will help to protect against bacteria while you’re asleep. Spit out any excess toothpaste after brushing – but you may not want to rinse your mouth thoroughly, as you want to leave a thin film of fluoride on your teeth for as long as possible.

Don’t Put Off The Dentist!

Finally, it’s important to attend regular checkups with your dentist, as they will be able to spot the early warning signs of tooth decay, gum disease and even oral cancer. Your dentist will also be able to perform a deep clean to remove any plaque or tartar build-up on your teeth and around the gum line.

With this regimen in place, you’ll be able to keep your bright smile for a lifetime.

8 Things To Actually Know Before Selecting Clear Aligners

8 Things To Actually Know Before Selecting Clear Aligners

Perhaps you or your friends have been talking about clear aligners as an alternative to traditional braces.

Fact is, both can do a great job of straightening teeth — but which one is right for you? Here’s a helpful review of what clear aligners do, plus, nine things to consider before making your decision.

Let’s get it straight

Just what are clear aligners, and what do they do? This little video from Checkdent is a great intro.


Now for the eight things to consider…

Number 1. Everyone’s a candidate – maybe.

Candidate for Clear Aligners

Generally, clear aligners work for most people, but certain factors may disqualify you. These include a history of gum disease, TMJ Pain, and teeth that are loose. Ask your dental practitioner for a complete examination of your mouth, consideration of your dental and medical history, and your lifestyle requirements.

Number 2. Clear aligners versus braces

Clear Aligners Versus Traditional Braces

Clear aligners can handle a variety of issues, but for certain conditions, traditional braces are the better choice. These would include serious teeth overcrowding and twisted teeth. If these are not a problem, one of the main advantages of clear aligners is the comfort factor, as the absence of brackets and wires prevents irritation. And of course, cosmetically, clear aligners are more pleasant to look at.

Number 3. An orthodontist OR a dentist can treat you.

Orthodontist Or Dentist For Clear Aligners

If your dentist offers a particular clear aligner system, you can be confident in his or her ability to treat you. However, if your case requires additional orthodontics, or the case is complicated, you may end up in the hands of an orthodontist. You and your dentist can decide what the right choice is for you, and also what makes you most comfortable.  In either case, the supervision of a dental professional is always superior to “mail order” orthodontics.

Number 4. “How do I pay for this?”

Paying for Clear Aligners

Of course, it is important to be aware of the costs – clear aligner treatments range from $2,000 to $7,000. Check with your insurance company to see if you can receive at least partial coverage. Also, look at financing options, either through your practitioner’s office or through your bank.

Number 5. Are your teeth ready for take-off?

Teeth Must Be Ready for Takeoff with Clear Aligners

It is crucial you make sure your teeth are in stable condition before starting treatment. Have your teeth been cleaned? Cavities filled? Are your gums in good shape? Changes in your mouth caused by these issues can throw off the effectiveness and accuracy of the clear plastic trays. Make sure to see a dentist in order to verify the condition of your teeth.

Number 6. Can you handle it?

Reminder About Clear Aligners

Clear aligners may require wearing for up to 22 hours a day. You have to remember to put them back in after brushing/flossing and eating, etc. Are you up to the challenge or will you conveniently “forget” to do what is necessary? Traditional braces may be the better choice if you can’t stick with the program.

Number 7. Don’t try this at home (or away).

Eating With Clear Aligner Trays On

If you were to wear clear aligners while you eat and drink, it’s a good bet that food and liquids will make their way between the tray and the teeth, then set in under pressure to cause staining, decay, and bad breath. Yuck! It’s a “must” to remove your aligners before dining, then remember to brush and floss before replacing them. If this sounds too inconvenient, consider traditional braces.

Number 8. “It ain’t over till it’s over.”

Sleeping With A Retainer

After treatment with clear aligner trays, retainers will be worn, usually all the time for the first three months, then just at night. But remember, retainers are worn after traditional braces, too.

In summary, take a look at your preferences, your dental condition and lifestyle. Weigh your options with the help of your practitioner, and get a great smile, your way! Oh, and stay away from mail order braces!

Source: Woman’s Health

Why Tongue-Cleaning Is No Gag!

Why Tongue-Cleaning Is No Gag!

So you brush, you floss and you see your dentist every six months – you think you’re on your best behavior for protecting your teeth but …

Consider the other part of your mouth that could cause trouble if you don’t also keep it clean. We’re speaking of the part known as your tongue. Keeping this kindly beast clean can actually help you stay healthier and fresher smelling (in your mouth, that is) over the long haul.

Why it’s good to clean your tongue

1. The tongue’s important — its surface is like the surface of, say, a coral reef – filled with small tubers (in the case of the tongue, they’re called papillae) that give you the sense of taste and texture when you eat or drink or put something you shouldn’t into your mouth.

2. Bad bacteria afoot — The tongue can foster a goodly number of bacteria. Granted, not all bacteria in the body is bad for you (in fact, most are good) but certain bacteria species can lead to tooth decay, gum infections and bad breath (halitosis). Plaque is a form of this, as you probably know, which creates a biofilm that coats your teeth, leading to cavities.

3. Flotsam — On top of this, the tongue often carries food residue and dead cells that can wreak havoc in your mouth, if not removed. Properly cleaning your tongue will prevent much of this trouble and keep your mouth healthy (and healthy-smelling!). Indeed, research shows that cleaning the tongue can clear bacteria and improve bad breath more than brushing alone.

4. Good taste — Research indicates that cleaning your tongue can actually improve your sense of taste. When you scrape or clean the surface of the tongue, it’s almost the same as starting with a whole new palette! After properly cleaning your tongue for a couple of weeks, see if you’ll notice stronger flavors the next time you eat!

5. Bigger problems — Cleaning your tongue gives you an opportunity to examine it for signs of something wrong – if you see a white, black or red discoloration – or ongoing sores, wounds or pain, make an appointment and consult your dentist (us) for further investigation – don’t let it go for too long!

Cleaning your tongue the right way

Now if the idea of reaching in there and cleaning/scraping your tongue makes you want to gag, don’t worry – it’s not as uncomfortable as you might think, especially as you get used to it — trust us, the benefits outweigh the time and effort.

Method 1 – Brushing – So you brush your teeth twice a day, do you? While you’re at it, use your trusty toothbrush to gently clean your tongue with a small dab of toothpaste. It’s like you’re cleaning your carpet – only a lot more often (and a lot smaller area than a carpet).

 Method 2 – Tongue Scraping – Tongue scrapers are made of plastic, copper or stainless steel and are available at most pharmacies, usually for under $10.

Brush your teeth, floss and rinse as usual. Then, stick out your tongue and gently press and hold the scraper once or twice along the entire surface, starting at the back of the tongue and scraping forward. Apply enough pressure as you see fit to get it to work. After each pass, rinse the scraper with warm water and then rinse your mouth with water. Ahhh…

A Clean Scrape

Tongue scraping or tongue brushing just might be the answer to problems like bad breath, cavity prevention, gum disease prevention — plus, it will make you more aware of what’s going on inside your mouth.

If you want further advice on cleaning your tongue, ask us!

TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Sunday 10:08 AMWe’re currently closed, but please do contact us online, or leave a message. Thank you!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
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PATIENT CORNER

MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

FREE VIRTUAL DENTAL CONSULT!

Get It Here!

TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Sunday 10:08 AMWe’re currently closed, but please do contact us online, or leave a message. Thank you!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
FridayClosed
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

PATIENT CORNER

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU

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