John J. Kelly, DDSYour Smile | Your HealthThu, Sep 24, 2020
Thu, Sep 24, 2020

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Chicago, IL 60646
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A Few Clouds

74°F

23°C

FOR GREAT SMILES!

Call us today at  
773-631-6844
 

EASY TO FIND!

5350 West Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Get details!

A Few Clouds

74°F

23°C

FOR GREAT SMILES

Request a visit online or
Call 773.631.6844
Do it today!

WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

5350 W. Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Dental office details!

IN THIS ISSUE

Oops! Last Time Your Kids Saw A Dentist?

Oops! Last Time Your Kids Saw A Dentist?

Back to school time is always hectic, especially this year. But parents should never neglect the dentist if they want to preserve the health of their children. Here’s a quick guide to what’s necessary.

read more
Oops! Last Time Your Kids Saw A Dentist?

Oops! Last Time Your Kids Saw A Dentist?

Back to school time is always hectic, especially this year. But parents should never neglect the dentist if they want to preserve the health of their children. Here’s a quick guide to what’s necessary.

read more
I Am Not Tired. Really!

I Am Not Tired. Really!

Unexplained tiredness always needs investigation. Sleep apnea, diabetes, anemia, celiac disease and mental health problems are among the issues that can present as exhaustion. Read more about it.

read more
I Am Not Tired. Really!

I Am Not Tired. Really!

Unexplained tiredness always needs investigation. Sleep apnea, diabetes, anemia, celiac disease and mental health problems are among the issues that can present as exhaustion. Read more about it.

read more
Can You Ace This Flu Quiz?

Can You Ace This Flu Quiz?

Let’s face it – by now, you should have had your flu shot. Not you? Check out this nifty quiz about the flu – see if you can get ’em all right…

read more
Teeth-Falling-Out Dreams: What Do They Mean?

Teeth-Falling-Out Dreams: What Do They Mean?

Dreams in which your teeth fall out are disturbing and can seem real. When you wake up, you may even check you still have a full set. A few theories try to explain why teeth-falling-out dreams occur. Take a look!

read more
Can You Ace This Flu Quiz?

Can You Ace This Flu Quiz?

Let’s face it – by now, you should have had your flu shot. Not you? Check out this nifty quiz about the flu – see if you can get ’em all right…

read more
Teeth-Falling-Out Dreams: What Do They Mean?

Teeth-Falling-Out Dreams: What Do They Mean?

Dreams in which your teeth fall out are disturbing and can seem real. When you wake up, you may even check you still have a full set. A few theories try to explain why teeth-falling-out dreams occur. Take a look!

read more

our little video

More Good Stuff

Perspectives: Confronting A COVID-19-Related Panic Attack

Perspectives: Confronting A COVID-19-Related Panic Attack

Panic attacks can be so severe, people often compare them to a heart attack or stroke. They can have a profound effect on your happiness, career and family life.

Panic attacks can make you to feel like you’re physically and mentally out of control. Physical symptoms can include shaking, feeling disorientated, nausea, rapid, irregular heartbeats, dry mouth, breathlessness, sweating and dizziness. It’s a roller coaster of unpleasantness, and once it’s over, there’s the fear that another attack will soon come.

Dental Tip: If you find yourself getting or being anxious, be aware if you are grinding or clenching your teeth. Visit your dentist to monitor wear-and-tear, and perhaps investigate wearing a mouth guard to prevent further damage.

People choose to deal with panic attacks in various ways, from doing nothing, to self-coaching, to professional therapy or prescription medications, to herbal remedies and lifestyle changes. The ultimate goal, however, is to become skilled in dealing with them. Properly handled, individuals suffering from panic attacks can work to lower their severity, shorten their duration, decrease their frequency – even eliminate them altogether.

Here are three perspectives to consider…

#1 Breathe, baby, breathe!

Panic attacks can cause shortness of breath and hyperventilation. They create an imbalance in oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in the blood. So a major goal is simply to bring breathing back under control.


Pscyhologist Dr. Helen Odessky believes trying to breath normally is the best cure for a panic attack. Take a look!


Britain’s National Health Service recommends the following:

  • Inhale slowly, deeply and gently through the nose.
  • When exhaling, do the same as inhaling, but through the mouth, instead of the nose.
  • Counting from one to five on each inhale and each exhale has been found to be helpful.

#2 Concentration

During a panic attack, try not to focus on what it is that you’re feeling and why. Instead, concentrate on your breathing – and in case you have a “happy place”, go there as well.


Spend thirty minutes with psychologist, Dr. Becky Spelman, on the subject of panic attacks. It’s like you’re in therapy, but free!

#3 Coaching Yourself

The reasons for panic attacks are numerous and varied – so coaching yourself to withstand them may take a personalized approach. For example, there’s the question of whether to “face your fears” and purposely place yourself in situations that can cause panic attacks, or instead, do your best to avoid those situations altogether. The correct answer may simply depend on what’s right for you.

Here’s short video from MWH (Managing Workplace Health) on taking control of your panic attack.

Coaching yourself is a wise idea – it’s good to be prepared for that “surprise attack”. Condition yourself to immediately acknowledge that you have been through this before, and not to panic about your panic – so to speak.

Also, train yourself to have the expectation that “This too shall pass.” – you are not going to come to any harm.

Nevertheless, if attacks persist for long periods of time or with increasing frequency, it may be time to seek medical help. Whatever you do, don’t be shy about taking control of your panic attacks. And watch that teeth grinding!

Got Mouth Ulcers? Your Dentist Could Help!

Got Mouth Ulcers? Your Dentist Could Help!

Mouth ulcers are small sores on the inside of your cheeks or lips, on your gums, or on the rear parts of your tongue. They can be visible as white, pink, or dark red spots, are often swollen, and can seem to get bigger or spread if left untreated. Your dentist may be able to help.

read more
I’m Not A Dentist, But I Play One On TV (Or In The Movies) – Revisited

I’m Not A Dentist, But I Play One On TV (Or In The Movies) – Revisited

Contributed by Bryan Armetta

On the big screen – and the little screen, too – there are plenty of plot lines featuring MD’s, lawyers, scientists, etc. – but dentists? “Stratching my head here.”

Wait! Hold on! In point of fact, there’s plenty of proof dentists actually do get their 15 minutes – or more – of fame. Here’s Part I of our new feature we call, “I’m Not A Dentist, But I Play One On TV (Or In The Movies)”. Open up and say, “Ah ha!”


Tim Whatley | Seinfeld

Portrayed expertly by Breaking Bad’s Bryan Cranston, Dr. Tim Whatley is accused by Jerry of converting to Judaism purely for a perceived ability to tell jokes. Upper West Side dentists are outraged, culminating in Jerry receiving the label “anti-dentite”. Take a look…

As a recurring character, Dr. Whatley had plenty of other great moments – most too tawdry to mention here. You can search for him on YouTube!


Hermey the Elf | Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

How could we leave this lovable holiday elf off the list? Toiling away in Santa’s workshop, Hermey dreams of one day becoming a dentist and opening up his own office.

While the other characters in this made-for-TV animated special react with surprise, Hermey remains committed to chasing his dream, even after helping out Rudolph in his quest to save Christmas. In the end, Hermey gets the “OK” from Santa to follow his dream, opening a dental office right there in the North Pole (where office space is much, much cheaper).


Dr. King Schultz | Django Unchained

In Quentin Tarantino’s strange tale of the Old West, a traveling dentist, played by Christoph Waltz, makes his real living off bounty hunting and liberating slaves, such as the titular Django. played by Jamie Foxx. It’s bizarre seeing Dr. Schultz travel the South in a horse-drawn cart topped by a giant, spring-loaded tooth. Here’s a clip…

The cart, incidentally, eventually explodes in a ploy designed to kill off a bunch of dimwitted KKK members. Although he has given up his practice, Dr. Schultz stays a dentist at heart, which makes even more sense given his final showdown with Leonardo DiCaprio’s plantation-owning Calvin Candie.


Orin Scrivello | Little Shop of Horrors

In this classic 1986 musical-comedy, legendary funny man, Steve Martin, plays Orin Scrivello, an egomaniacal leather-clad dentist who truly relishes the act of inflicting pain on his fearful patients. To make matters worse, Orin has a serious addiction to nitrous, especially on the job.

While Orin is a morally reprehensible character, he does get exactly what he deserves in the end (that is, besides losing his membership in the ADA).


Stu Price | The Hangover

in 2009’s R-rated hit, Office cast member, Ed Helms, plays Stu, a square, uptight dentist, brow-beaten by his wife. After a night of Las Vegas mayhem, Stu wakes up married to a stripper he met the night before.

In the sequel, Stu awakens to an even worse fate – a facial tattoo akin to that worn by champion boxer, Mike Tyson, which obviously leads to more confusion and chaotic fun.


Dr. Jerry Robinson | The Bob Newhart Show

In a cast of colorful characters, Dr. Jerry Robinson from the 70’s mega-hit comedy, The Bob Newhart Show, is a standout. Portrayed by actor, Peter Bonerz, Jerry could be described as eccentric, impulsive and very easily frustrated. Jerry always manages to astonish us with his “unique” point of view. His dialogue with sharp-tongued receptionist, Carol, makes for some satisfying comedy.


Well, that’s our first installment of “I’m Not A Dentist, But I Play One On TV (Or In The Movies)”. Stay tuned for more sometime soon!

Expecting? Your Oral Health Counts!

Expecting? Your Oral Health Counts!

Pregnancy is a busy time, but for your mouth, it can be a dangerous one. Hormonal changes in your body can leave your oral health, and your overall health, at risk.

Women are more likely to get gingivitis when they are pregnant, an infection of the gums that can lead to swelling. Bleeding may also occur while brushing and flossing your teeth. Without treatment, it can affect the tissues that keep your teeth in their proper position. To make sure gingivitis does not affect you, your dentist may recommend visits more than once during your pregnancy.

In addition to gingivitis, tiny lumps on the surface of your gums may also appear, and these can bleed easily. They are often called “pregnancy tumors,” but they are not dangerous and usually disappear after your child is born.


Check out this great video about Pregnancy and Newborn Oral Health from the American Dental Association!


Crucial Dental Care

Visit your dentist during pregnancy. Make sure your dentist knows that you are pregnant and report changes in your oral condition to them. If you are taking any medications or supplements, let them know this as well.

If your dentist is to prescribe medication as part of more extensive treatment, he or she will avoid drugs considered unsafe for pregnant women. By example, penicillin or amoxicillin may be safe, but tetracycline can stain the fetus’ teeth permanently and will not be used.

At times it may be very important to obtain an x-ray of your teeth for treatment during pregnancy. This may cause concern, however, your dentist will protect you with a special apron for your abdomen, and a thyroid collar. Discuss this thoroughly with your dentist to allay any fears you may have.

Take care of your own teeth!

Brush While Your Pregnant

Cavities and gum disease can cause you to go to the dentist for treatment more than you have to. Brush your teeth carefully two times daily with fluoride toothpaste. Don’t forget to clean between teeth with floss or other method. It is best to ask your dentist or hygienist the best way to do this correctly.

You are what you eat.

Avoid sugary, high-carb snacks that can cling to teeth, cause bacterial plaque and other problems. Bacteria have the ability to convert sugars and starches to acids which can eat away at tooth enamel. The best way to prevent this is to say “no” to the wrong foods. It’s better for your baby, too!

Oral health affects the entire body.

Our oral health is an important part of your overall health, and untreated dental disease can be harmful to you and your baby. Be sure to include your oral health in your daily self-care routine and keep your dentist informed of any changes in your oral health during pregnancy.

Perspectives: Confronting A COVID-19-Related Panic Attack

Perspectives: Confronting A COVID-19-Related Panic Attack

Panic attacks can be so severe, people often compare them to a heart attack or stroke. They can have a profound effect on your happiness, career and family life.

Panic attacks can make you to feel like you’re physically and mentally out of control. Physical symptoms can include shaking, feeling disorientated, nausea, rapid, irregular heartbeats, dry mouth, breathlessness, sweating and dizziness. It’s a roller coaster of unpleasantness, and once it’s over, there’s the fear that another attack will soon come.

Dental Tip: If you find yourself getting or being anxious, be aware if you are grinding or clenching your teeth. Visit your dentist to monitor wear-and-tear, and perhaps investigate wearing a mouth guard to prevent further damage.

People choose to deal with panic attacks in various ways, from doing nothing, to self-coaching, to professional therapy or prescription medications, to herbal remedies and lifestyle changes. The ultimate goal, however, is to become skilled in dealing with them. Properly handled, individuals suffering from panic attacks can work to lower their severity, shorten their duration, decrease their frequency – even eliminate them altogether.

Here are three perspectives to consider…

#1 Breathe, baby, breathe!

Panic attacks can cause shortness of breath and hyperventilation. They create an imbalance in oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in the blood. So a major goal is simply to bring breathing back under control.


Pscyhologist Dr. Helen Odessky believes trying to breath normally is the best cure for a panic attack. Take a look!


Britain’s National Health Service recommends the following:

  • Inhale slowly, deeply and gently through the nose.
  • When exhaling, do the same as inhaling, but through the mouth, instead of the nose.
  • Counting from one to five on each inhale and each exhale has been found to be helpful.

#2 Concentration

During a panic attack, try not to focus on what it is that you’re feeling and why. Instead, concentrate on your breathing – and in case you have a “happy place”, go there as well.


Spend thirty minutes with psychologist, Dr. Becky Spelman, on the subject of panic attacks. It’s like you’re in therapy, but free!

#3 Coaching Yourself

The reasons for panic attacks are numerous and varied – so coaching yourself to withstand them may take a personalized approach. For example, there’s the question of whether to “face your fears” and purposely place yourself in situations that can cause panic attacks, or instead, do your best to avoid those situations altogether. The correct answer may simply depend on what’s right for you.

Here’s short video from MWH (Managing Workplace Health) on taking control of your panic attack.

Coaching yourself is a wise idea – it’s good to be prepared for that “surprise attack”. Condition yourself to immediately acknowledge that you have been through this before, and not to panic about your panic – so to speak.

Also, train yourself to have the expectation that “This too shall pass.” – you are not going to come to any harm.

Nevertheless, if attacks persist for long periods of time or with increasing frequency, it may be time to seek medical help. Whatever you do, don’t be shy about taking control of your panic attacks. And watch that teeth grinding!

Got Mouth Ulcers? Your Dentist Could Help!

Got Mouth Ulcers? Your Dentist Could Help!

Mouth ulcers are small sores on the inside of your cheeks or lips, on your gums, or on the rear parts of your tongue. They can be visible as white, pink, or dark red spots, are often swollen, and can seem to get bigger or spread if left untreated. Your dentist may be able to help.

read more

TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

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MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

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TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Thursday 12:32 PMWe're currently open!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
FridayClosed
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

PATIENT CORNER

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU

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