John J. Kelly, DDS Your Smile | Your Health Wed, Aug 4, 2021
Wed, Aug 4, 2021

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Chicago, IL 60646
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FOR GREAT SMILES!

Call us today at  
773-631-6844
 

EASY TO FIND!

5350 West Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Get details!

A Few Clouds

82°F

28°C

FOR GREAT SMILES

Request a visit online or
Call 773.631.6844
Do it today!

WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

5350 W. Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
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IN THIS ISSUE

Baby “No-No’s” Part I – Food!

Baby “No-No’s” Part I – Food!

Keeping your child adorable, healthy and happy takes a lot of work, and requires some knowledge of what is good and bad for the little tike. Here are some food choices you may want to think hard about.

read more
Baby “No-No’s” Part I – Food!

Baby “No-No’s” Part I – Food!

Keeping your child adorable, healthy and happy takes a lot of work, and requires some knowledge of what is good and bad for the little tike. Here are some food choices you may want to think hard about.

read more
Read This! Must-Do’s During A Dental Emergency

Read This! Must-Do’s During A Dental Emergency

A dental emergency is not only painful, it could also cause life-long health issues, if not treated immediately. But what if there’s no dentist around? Here’s some advice on what to do in the event of a dental emergency involving you or your child.

read more
Read This! Must-Do’s During A Dental Emergency

Read This! Must-Do’s During A Dental Emergency

A dental emergency is not only painful, it could also cause life-long health issues, if not treated immediately. But what if there’s no dentist around? Here’s some advice on what to do in the event of a dental emergency involving you or your child.

read more

our little video

More Good Stuff

Diet Soda Health Issues? Here Are Six…

Diet Soda Health Issues? Here Are Six…

In their quest to lose weight, many dieters turn to sugar-free soda to lower their sugar intake. Unfortunately, these beverages may not be the savior calorie-savers we imagine them to be.

There’s strong evidence that excessive diet soda consumption carries some serious hidden health risks. Here are six of them…

No. 1 — Dental Problems

According to a University of Melbourne study, diet sodas can be severely damaging to your teeth, even though they contain no sugar.

Regular soft drinks cause decay when their sugars convert to acids, which go on to attack dental enamel. Diet sodas, on the other hand, cut out a step, delivering higher amounts of phosphoric, citric and tartaric acids directly to teeth.

These acids add flavor and texture to diet drinks to compensate for the lack of sugar – but they pack a real punch to your beautiful smile.

No. 2 — Increased Risk of Diabetes

A recent study found that volunteers who took controlled amounts of artificial sweeteners, like those found in diet soda, had an impaired response to glucose in their blood.

Researchers believe this increases the long-term risks of developing Type 2 diabetes, one of the most serious medical problems in the modern world.

No. 3 — Weight Gain

Although diet sodas are most often consumed as part of a weight loss program, they can actually be counterproductive. The disruption in glucose response can lead to weight gain in people who drink large amounts.

What’s more, it’s thought that artificial sweeteners such as sucralose can disrupt metabolic rates, reducing the body’s ability to burn through calories as easily as it should.

No. 4 — Heart Problems

A 2014 study found that women who drank diet sodas daily had a 29% higher risk of heart attacks than those who drank them rarely. Also, they had a 31% higher risk of suffering a stroke.

Backed by both the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association, this study doesn’t claim diet sodas are the direct cause of these increased risks. However, the figures certainly deserve further investigation.

No. 5 — Suppressed Gut Bacteria

Researchers have found that the six most commonly used artificial sweeteners have a suppression effect on beneficial gut bacteria, limiting their growth and reproduction.

Low gut flora levels lead to fatigue, a poor immune system, unexpected weight changes, and sleep disturbance among many other health problems. Cutting back on diet soda could be much more effective in combating low flora than drinking expensive probiotic drinks.

No. 6 — Dementia

Lastly, a 2017 study found that frequent diet soda drinkers had three times the risk of developing dementia in later life compared to those who avoided artificial sweeteners. No explanation has been found for this effect, but the researchers involved found the results significant enough to recommend further study.

It’s important to note that all these effects are linked to particularly heavy consumption of diet sodas. A glass or two per day is unlikely to carry any significant risks. Nonetheless, if diet soda makes up a large part of your weight loss program, then it’s only sensible to keep a close eye on how much you’re consuming.

As dental professionals, we are particularly concerned about the effects of sugar-free drinks on your teeth. Speak with us about your habits during your next visit!

Can Breathing Through Your Mouth Injure Your Teeth?

Can Breathing Through Your Mouth Injure Your Teeth?

A recent study demonstrates the elevated incidence of dental erosion and decay in mouth-breathers.

A study by researchers from University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, published in the Journal of Oral Rehabilitation made this illuminating discovery.

OMG! How does this happen?

It’s not a secret that dry mouth, also known as xerostomia, can be an inconvenient and uncomfortable condition. But it’s still quite common. It can be caused by sleeping habits, certain medications, or even something as simple as a stuffy nose that forces you to breathe through your mouth. It can also have a real impact on your dental health in addition to being a nuisance. Here’s three reasons why a dry mouth can damage your teeth…

1. The bacteria in your mouth

Everyone’s teeth come under attack from the bacteria that live inside the mouth. These bacteria are especially active after you eat sugar or starchy, high-carb foods such as white bread. When these harmful bacteria digest sugars or starches, they create corrosive acids.

As you can imagine, having these bacteria and the acids they produce sitting on your enamel isn’t good for your teeth. The acid can eat away at the structure of your enamel. So the role saliva plays in washing away the food debris and neutralizing the acids is critical, and dry mouth gives bacteria more leeway to damage your teeth.

2. The acidic foods you consume

In addition to bacteria-produced acids, any acids in food can start to eat away at your enamel as well. That’s because acids are corrosive to teeth, pulling out the calcium, magnesium and other structural minerals that your tooth enamel uses to keep it strong. Again, saliva helps wash out acids in your mouth, but mouth-breathing prevents this from happening.

3. Remineralization complication

Saliva is your mouth’s tool to supply calcium, magnesium, and other critical substances to the outside of your enamel to help replace any minerals that leach out due to the contact from acid.

With dry mouth, you may not have enough saliva to provide the minerals that your teeth need for self-repair. In this situation, your teeth will gradually become weaker and more susceptible to cavities.

How did the study go down, again?

Groups of subjects “forced” to breathe, or not breathe, through the mouth were studied. Acidity levels of saliva in the mouth were measured. The researchers discovered that, at certain times during the night, acidity levels for mouth-breathers went beyond the threshold at which erosion of tooth enamel occurs.

Researchers saw that dentists have been reporting more patients with “dry mouth”, especially during sleep or upon awakening. Dry mouth is associated with mouth-breathing.

Mouth-breathing during sleep can cause saliva to evaporate, a defense mechanism for preventing the mouth from becoming too acidic. Acidity in the mouth can lead to enamel loss through erosion (from acid without the influence of bacteria) and tooth decay, or caries (the effect of bacteria breaking down foods to produce acid).

Researchers compared pH and temperature levels in the mouths of 10 healthy subjects. Each slept with, then without, a nose clip that forced them to breathe through the mouth.

Volunteers were given a device that measures pH and temperature of the “palatal aspect of the upper central incisors”, which they wore for two sets of 48 hours.

During the time subjects wore the clip, they experienced a drop in pH to a dangerous 3.6 – the threshold is 5.5 for when tooth enamel starts to break down.

Dr. Choi, the study’s head, concluded that, as the first study of its kind, mouth-breathing has a definitive effect on acidity levels, and the probable result of advancing tooth decay.

Mouth-breathing seems innocent enough, but it should be taken seriously. If you notice that you or someone close to you is breathing through the mouth at night, it is advisable to seek a professional evaluation with a sleep-trained dentist or other practitioner.

Read This! Must-Do’s During A Dental Emergency

Read This! Must-Do’s During A Dental Emergency

Your child falls off a swing and knocks out a tooth. Your spouse is having constant pain in his or her mouth, and the gums are starting to swell. You manage to crack a tooth when you inadvertently bite down on a small pebble hidden in your granola…

All of these are events that should be immediately treated by a dentist, to avoid tooth and health problems down the road. But what if you can’t get to a dentist right away?

If a tooth has been knocked out…

Make sure that your hands are clean, and never hold the tooth by the root end.

Rinse the tooth in water, especially the root. Remember, rinse, don’t scrub. Don’t even remove any tissue that might still be clinging to the tooth. If you can get the tooth back in its socket, that would be best. And, of course, make sure the tooth is facing in the right direction when you put it back.

If you can’t put the tooth back, put it in a cup of milk, or water with a pinch of salt. Immediately call your dentist. If you can see the dentist within an hour of having the tooth knocked out, there is a much better chance of the tooth being saved.

If a toothache is the problem…

Try rinsing with warm water first. Floss to remove any food between the teeth (often, this may solve the problem without doing anything further). For swelling, use something cold, like an ice pack, on the cheek. Never use a cold pack on the gums themselves; it could damage the dental tissue.

If there is swelling due to infection, never try to treat the infection on your own; remember that a toothache with swelling can also be a sign of gum disease. Call your dentist right away.

For cracked, chipped or broken teeth…

Save the pieces, if there are any. Rinse your mouth to make sure there aren’t any chips left. If you’re bleeding, press on the wound with a piece of gauze, a paper towel, a clean cloth, or whatever you have handy (a finger will do in a pinch) for about ten minutes or until the bleeding stops.

Avoid swelling by using an ice pack against the cheek or mouth near the injured tooth. Call the dentist, let them know your situation, and get an appointment as soon as possible. Remember, these types of injuries, left untreated, can cause additional damage to other parts of your mouth, or lead infection in the tooth.

Here’s a great little video from Delta Dental that speaks to a classic dental emergency.

Some of us tend to ignore dental problems because we just don’t have the time to fix them, or are worried about the expense. Here are two important notes…

First, if you are delaying calling your dentist because you don’t think they’re available, or you don’t want to inconvenience them, remember that, just like other doctors, dentists factor in time for emergency patients. They know that accidents happen, and they want to be sure their clients are taken care of.

Second, ignoring the situation now might save money in the short term, but damage to your teeth or an infection can lead to other more serious health problems down the road. For example, studies show that people with gum disease have a higher chance of developing heart disease and strokes.

The net-net: If you have a dental emergency, take care of it quickly. You may be saving more than just your teeth.

Diet Soda Health Issues? Here Are Six…

Diet Soda Health Issues? Here Are Six…

In their quest to lose weight, many dieters turn to sugar-free soda to lower their sugar intake. Unfortunately, these beverages may not be the savior calorie-savers we imagine them to be.

There’s strong evidence that excessive diet soda consumption carries some serious hidden health risks. Here are six of them…

No. 1 — Dental Problems

According to a University of Melbourne study, diet sodas can be severely damaging to your teeth, even though they contain no sugar.

Regular soft drinks cause decay when their sugars convert to acids, which go on to attack dental enamel. Diet sodas, on the other hand, cut out a step, delivering higher amounts of phosphoric, citric and tartaric acids directly to teeth.

These acids add flavor and texture to diet drinks to compensate for the lack of sugar – but they pack a real punch to your beautiful smile.

No. 2 — Increased Risk of Diabetes

A recent study found that volunteers who took controlled amounts of artificial sweeteners, like those found in diet soda, had an impaired response to glucose in their blood.

Researchers believe this increases the long-term risks of developing Type 2 diabetes, one of the most serious medical problems in the modern world.

No. 3 — Weight Gain

Although diet sodas are most often consumed as part of a weight loss program, they can actually be counterproductive. The disruption in glucose response can lead to weight gain in people who drink large amounts.

What’s more, it’s thought that artificial sweeteners such as sucralose can disrupt metabolic rates, reducing the body’s ability to burn through calories as easily as it should.

No. 4 — Heart Problems

A 2014 study found that women who drank diet sodas daily had a 29% higher risk of heart attacks than those who drank them rarely. Also, they had a 31% higher risk of suffering a stroke.

Backed by both the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association, this study doesn’t claim diet sodas are the direct cause of these increased risks. However, the figures certainly deserve further investigation.

No. 5 — Suppressed Gut Bacteria

Researchers have found that the six most commonly used artificial sweeteners have a suppression effect on beneficial gut bacteria, limiting their growth and reproduction.

Low gut flora levels lead to fatigue, a poor immune system, unexpected weight changes, and sleep disturbance among many other health problems. Cutting back on diet soda could be much more effective in combating low flora than drinking expensive probiotic drinks.

No. 6 — Dementia

Lastly, a 2017 study found that frequent diet soda drinkers had three times the risk of developing dementia in later life compared to those who avoided artificial sweeteners. No explanation has been found for this effect, but the researchers involved found the results significant enough to recommend further study.

It’s important to note that all these effects are linked to particularly heavy consumption of diet sodas. A glass or two per day is unlikely to carry any significant risks. Nonetheless, if diet soda makes up a large part of your weight loss program, then it’s only sensible to keep a close eye on how much you’re consuming.

As dental professionals, we are particularly concerned about the effects of sugar-free drinks on your teeth. Speak with us about your habits during your next visit!

TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Wednesday 7:14 PMWe’re currently closed, but please do contact us online, or leave a message. Thank you!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
FridayClosed
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WE’RE HERE FOR YOU

PATIENT CORNER

MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

FREE VIRTUAL DENTAL CONSULT!

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TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Wednesday 7:14 PMWe’re currently closed, but please do contact us online, or leave a message. Thank you!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
FridayClosed
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

PATIENT CORNER

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU

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