John J. Kelly, DDS Your Smile | Your Health Thu, Aug 18, 2022
John J. Kelly, DDS Aug 18, 2022

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Chicago, IL 60646
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FOR GREAT SMILES!

Call us today at  
773-631-6844
 

EASY TO FIND!

5350 West Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Get details!

EASY TO FIND!

5350 West Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Get details!

FOR GREAT SMILES

Request a visit online or
Call 773.631.6844
Do it today!

WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

5350 W. Devon Av.
Chicago, IL 60646
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IN THIS ISSUE

5 Myths About Root Canals You Need to Stop Believing

5 Myths About Root Canals You Need to Stop Believing

If you’ve ever gotten information on the Web about root canals, but questioned whether it was true – or even if you’ve heard someone say they are headed for a root canal, and always wondered what that was but were too embarrassed to ask, this article is for you.

read more
The 5 Stages of Dental Caries

The 5 Stages of Dental Caries

Knowing just how a cavity forms isn’t just educational and good fun, it also helps you better understand why it’s important to keep your teeth clean and visit us as often as necessary. Take a look at how tooth decay works. (Gory pictures not included)

read more
5 Myths About Root Canals You Need to Stop Believing

5 Myths About Root Canals You Need to Stop Believing

If you’ve ever gotten information on the Web about root canals, but questioned whether it was true – or even if you’ve heard someone say they are headed for a root canal, and always wondered what that was but were too embarrassed to ask, this article is for you.

read more
The 5 Stages of Dental Caries

The 5 Stages of Dental Caries

Knowing just how a cavity forms isn’t just educational and good fun, it also helps you better understand why it’s important to keep your teeth clean and visit us as often as necessary. Take a look at how tooth decay works. (Gory pictures not included)

read more
How to Look Younger – Instantly!

How to Look Younger – Instantly!

Most women wouldn’t mind being mistaken for five or 10 years under their real age. Adopting a healthy lifestyle is a smart way to look younger in the long run – but what if you want to look younger right now?

read more
How to Look Younger – Instantly!

How to Look Younger – Instantly!

Most women wouldn’t mind being mistaken for five or 10 years under their real age. Adopting a healthy lifestyle is a smart way to look younger in the long run – but what if you want to look younger right now?

read more
FLASH! 7 Ways Smoking Harms Oral Health

FLASH! 7 Ways Smoking Harms Oral Health

Smoking affects a person’s oral health in many ways, and most smokers are unaware of the relationship. Let’s take a closer look at the harm caused by smoking to the mouth, teeth, gums, and throat.

read more
FLASH! 7 Ways Smoking Harms Oral Health

FLASH! 7 Ways Smoking Harms Oral Health

Smoking affects a person’s oral health in many ways, and most smokers are unaware of the relationship. Let’s take a closer look at the harm caused by smoking to the mouth, teeth, gums, and throat.

read more

our little video

More Good Stuff

Extra! Dental News from Around The Web!

Extra! Dental News from Around The Web!

Greetings and welcome to another collection of dental news you can use!

In this month’s all-video roundup, hear great advice on how to eat better with dentures, find the best toothpaste for your smile, conquer your fear of the dentist with CFT, and learn how present-day birds lost their teeth. Enjoy!

If you have questions related to any of these items, please do not hesitate to bring them up at your next dental appointment — or give us a call soon!

Stanley Cup Musings … How Can Hockey Players Save Their Teeth?

Stanley Cup Musings … How Can Hockey Players Save Their Teeth?

In a sport like hockey, exciting, fast-paced action can quickly lead to injuries.

Getting banged up and bruised is not something unique to this sport, but there is one type of damage that is more common in hockey than most any other – losing your teeth.

The image of a gap-toothed, ice-skating goon is classic, solidifying hockey’s status as one of the toughest sports in the world. Watch this brief HBO report to see what we mean.

Yet, all this oral punishment comes at a price. After decades of players “toughing it out”, a new generation of players is striving to pay more attention to their dental health with state-of-the-art dental protection.

Ice Hockey and Tooth Loss

Tooth reinsertion in hockey players

With 82 games per season in the NHL, it isn’t hard to see why players stand to earn a gap or two in their uppers and lowers. One solution, in some circumstances, is immediate tooth re-insertion.

According to American Academy of Implant Dentistry president Joseph Orrico, if a tooth should be knocked out during a game, it can be placed in a cold container of milk for preservation, and a dental professional can then surgically reinsert it, provided the procedure can be done within thirty minutes or so of the accident. That is why NHL teams usually have a dentist standing by during games in order to provide the quickest possible treatment.

As noted by Orrico, “there’s a short window of opportunity in which the remaining living tissue on the root surface can be kept alive. Milk has a neutral pH balance and is fortified with vitamins to make it an excellent medium for helping preserve teeth.”

This technique is only applicable if the tooth, including the root, is completely knocked out. In cases where the tooth is broken above the gum line, the Academy suggests a root canal, accompanied by a crown, to ensure the tooth structure is maintained.

Dental implants of the removable kind

Fractures below the gum line tend to result in an extraction of tooth fragments and the insertion of dental implants. Age plays a role in this decision, as gradual bone loss can be a more important factor depending on how old a patient is.

Orrico says that now, the use of implants, which are artificial titanium tooth roots, could be a major benefit to young hockey players trying to protect their mouths.


Check out this news report from Spectrum/TimeWarner Cable News


As opposed to an unsecured prosthetic (dentures) Orrico believes that an implant-secured prosthesis is the way to go, due to its ability to preserve the health of the jawbone over time.

The prosthesis used by hockey players are actually removable, and can be taken out or put in before and after games, giving players flexibility, and reducing the chances of damage to the implant itself.

A change of habits

For the NFL, all the dental technology in the world can’t alter player attitudes overnight. However, a concentrated effort, starting at the youth level of play, can help future generations be smarter about protecting their dental health.

As noted in an article from the New York Times, mouth guards are now required to play in any level of amateur hockey. By the time young players go pro, their teeth will be looking better than those of the hard-nosed generations who came before them.

The NHL has a dentist’s association, which meets annually at the All-Star Game to discuss topics such as creating safer mouth guards and face masks, something that would have seemed unlikely just thirty years ago.

Despite notable advancements, the mindset of “toughing it out” at the cost of one’s teeth is still alive and well. While other physical ailments will result in taking the night off, hockey players often do not sit one out over a lost tooth. Some players even view losing teeth as a rite of passage, displaying them on their desks, or marking notches to keep count.

It comes as no surprise that players such as Brent Burns, one of the best defensemen in the game today, doesn’t even bring his removable implants with him on road trips. This is unfortunate because the use of implants can actually protect the positioning and stability of the player’s real teeth. Failure to wear the them can have negative long-term effects, including the collapse of gum tissue, causing remaining teeth to become unstable.

For anyone missing some teeth, it is strongly advised to speak with our office about using implants or other prosthetic method, if just for the sake of healthier teeth and gums.

Written by Bryan Armetta
Edited by Clifford Yurman

Six Simple Questions About Your Teeth, Answered!

Six Simple Questions About Your Teeth, Answered!

Sometimes, we forget the basics and bad habits set in.

Here are some obvious questions about dental hygiene that deserve a revisit.

1. Why do I have to brush my teeth?

Brushing isn’t just a bedtime ritual you learned when you were young, it’s a crucial tool for staying healthy.

Although your teeth may look clean, they’re actually covered with tiny bacteria commonly known as plaque. Left unchecked, plaque transforms into something called calculus, a.k.a. tartar, which can only be removed at your dentist’s office. If not cleaned out, tartar often leads to tooth decay and gum infection — sounds lovely…

Depending on how good you are at it, brushing can lessen the amount of plaque on your teeth, which decreases the tartar, which leads to fewer serious issues. Phew!

Warning! Plaque starts to regrow on your teeth within three to four hours after brushing, so for optimal dental hygiene, try to brush at least twice a day. And yes, you should use toothpaste. Not only does it help get rid of stubborn plaque, toothpaste helps re-mineralize your teeth, building a stronger foundation that prevents decay.

2. Do I actually need to floss?

Yes, you should absolutely be flossing! You may have come across news reports or studies claiming that flossing has no effect in preventing tooth decay. While these may be accurate, research has proven that lack of flossing can encourage other serious issues — like gum disease and bleeding gums. How’s that?

When you eat, food particles get stuck between teeth where it’s hard to reach with a toothbrush. Since where the food lands is often close to your gums, there is likelihood of infection if nothing is done. Flossing is a great way to remove those particles before they can do real damage.

YOU SHOULD KNOW! Many floss makers add a chemical to help floss glide more easily between teeth. Research once claimed that this chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), was safe. However, a new study by Emory University Rollins School of Public Health indicates, PFOA may cause or exacerbate thyroid disease.

What to do? Use a “natural” floss that’s free of PFOA, or rinse and reuse the floss that’s currently in your medicine cabinet to help minimize the PFOA coating. Smart!

3. Can’t I just use mouthwash to keep my teeth clean?

Think of a tooth as a dirty plate. If you pour dish soap over it and rinse it, some of the dirt will come off, but the rest will stay stuck. The same goes for your teeth.

Plaque buildup needs more than just mouthwash to get rid of it, and if left for too long, it can turn into tartar, which can damage your teeth. Mouthwash should be an optional addition to your dental routine, not the star attraction.

CAUTION! Alcohol is a known carcinogen. Most mouthwashes contain large amounts of alcohol, often up to 25%. Mouthwash can remain in your mouth for up to a minute, when used according to directions. This means, alcohol is swooshing around in your mouth even longer than would a sip of wine or whiskey. Experts recommend using a non-alcohol based mouthwash to reap the benefits without all the risks.

4. Is whitening my teeth bad?

It depends. Most over-the-counter teeth whitening strips are safe to use, so long as you follow directions. Leaving the strips on for too long or ingesting large amounts of the gel is bad for your health.

People with sensitive teeth and poor enamel can experience increased sensitivity, irritation and further degradation of enamel. Whitening done in your dentist’s office can be more reassuring, because your dentist is familiar with the condition of your teeth and can weigh in on how, and whether, to proceed.

5. What is a tongue brush?

A tongue brush is designed specifically to — well — brush your tongue. Above is a demo of how to use it. Alternatively, you can try using the bristles on your toothbrush to gently buff over the surface of your tongue. Just rinse your toothbrush thoroughly to ensure that your teeth don’t get an unnecessary dose of bacteria (you can also disinfect your toothbrush in a mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide).

6. Why do I need to worry about my teeth? Can’t I just get new ones?

Funny you should ask. You can’t regrow a tooth once you’ve lost it — at least not yet.

Most humans get their full set of permanent teeth around age 13. After that, if you lose or crack a tooth, you’ll have to get a prosthetic from your dentist. But be warned — new teeth cost a pretty penny. Best to take care of the ones you already have.

We hope you enjoyed these tips. Hopefully, there’ll be less drilling and filling at your next dental visit. Be sure to schedule one soon as you’re able!

Extra! Dental News from Around The Web!

Extra! Dental News from Around The Web!

Greetings and welcome to another collection of dental news you can use!

In this month’s all-video roundup, hear great advice on how to eat better with dentures, find the best toothpaste for your smile, conquer your fear of the dentist with CFT, and learn how present-day birds lost their teeth. Enjoy!

If you have questions related to any of these items, please do not hesitate to bring them up at your next dental appointment — or give us a call soon!

TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Thursday 2:35 PMWe're open!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
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MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

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TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Thursday 2:35 PMWe're open!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
FridayClosed
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

PATIENT CORNER

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU

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