John J. Kelly, DDS Your Smile | Your Health Sun, Feb 23, 2020
Sun, Feb 23, 2020

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GREAT SMILES!

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(773) 631-6844
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5350 West Devon Av
Chicago, IL 60646
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SURF ON OVER!

Visit our website
for more info.
Do it today!

Fair

39°F

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FOR GREAT SMILES!

Call us today at  
773-631-6844
 

EASY TO FIND!

5350 West Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Get details!

Fair

39°F

4°C

FOR GREAT SMILES

Request a visit online or
Call 773.631.6844
Do it today!

WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

5350 W. Devon Avenue
Chicago, IL 60646
Dental office details!

IN THIS ISSUE

Four Effective Ways to Treat Dry Eye Syndrome

Four Effective Ways to Treat Dry Eye Syndrome

Do you suffer from dry eye syndrome? This is a fairly common condition where the eye doesn’t produce enough tears to keep the surfaces of the eyes moist. Here are some solutions that may help get your eyes shining again.

read more
Four Effective Ways to Treat Dry Eye Syndrome

Four Effective Ways to Treat Dry Eye Syndrome

Do you suffer from dry eye syndrome? This is a fairly common condition where the eye doesn’t produce enough tears to keep the surfaces of the eyes moist. Here are some solutions that may help get your eyes shining again.

read more
Baby “No-No’s” Part I – Food!

Baby “No-No’s” Part I – Food!

Keeping your child adorable, healthy and happy takes a lot of work, and requires some knowledge of what is good and bad for the little tike. Here are some food choices you may want to think hard about.

read more
Baby “No-No’s” Part I – Food!

Baby “No-No’s” Part I – Food!

Keeping your child adorable, healthy and happy takes a lot of work, and requires some knowledge of what is good and bad for the little tike. Here are some food choices you may want to think hard about.

read more

our little video

More Good Stuff

How Smile Rejuvenation Can Make You Look Younger!

How Smile Rejuvenation Can Make You Look Younger!

Have you seen recent photographs of yourself and wondered, “Who’s that old person?”

Do you see that the lower third of your face is starting to wrinkle, sag or form jowls? Your immediate reaction may be that the only option you have for restoring your youthful appearance is “to have some work done” – but before you book that plastic surgery consult, why not drop by your dentist’s office first? It may sound crazy, but your sunken, aged face could be caused by none other than your teeth!

The Effects of Tooth Wear and Tear

It’s no surprise that teeth wear down naturally with age. This shortening/flattening of the teeth can make your upper and lower jaws move closer together when at rest. As a result, your nose and chin are closer together as well, which compresses the appearance of the lower portion of your face. When this happens, your lips and cheeks may look collapsed, and wrinkles will form around your mouth.

If you also have bruxism, your teeth will wear even faster than they do during the normal aging process. Bruxism is a fancy word for teeth grinding, often while you sleep, and it can make you look old before your time.

Worn or damaged teeth not only affect your appearance, they also contribute to an improper bite. Teeth that do not meet properly when you bite makes eating difficult, and they also lead to more episodes of unconscious teeth grinding, creating a vicious cycle of improper oral function and bruxism.

Non-Surgical Face-Lift!

In cases of worn teeth, a few simple dental procedures can make you look as if you’ve had a face-lift. By restoring the length of your teeth and ensuring that they are properly aligned when you bite and chew, the collapsed appearance of your lower face may very well disappear. Not only will your lips and cheeks appear fuller and more youthful with the right support, your bite will also feel more comfortable and function optimally.

Treatments To Rejuvenate Your Smile

To perform a smile rejuvenation, your dentist will first determine if you have bruxism or the related condition, TMJ disorder, which affects jaw joint functioning and can contribute to a misaligned bite. Treatment for these conditions will likely include the use of a night guard or occlusal splint to hold the jaw in the proper position and protect the teeth from the forces of clenching and grinding.

To rebuild the structure of teeth that are damaged due to aging or bruxism, your dentist will place either porcelain veneers or crowns on your teeth.

Veneers are thin porcelain laminates placed on the front teeth and can transform their length, shape and color.

Crowns, which can be constructed from a variety of materials, such as white porcelain that matches surrounding teeth, cover the entire tooth and are most often used on molars.

Sometimes teeth are so worn that they experience severe decay and cannot be saved. In such cases, your dentist will extract the tooth and replace it with a dental implant, which consists of an artificial tooth root topped off with a natural-looking porcelain restoration.

Whatever treatments are used, your smile rejuvenation will not only improve the appearance of your facial structure but also turn back the clock by giving you a brighter, youthful-looking face. See your dentist today!

Toothy Traces (Part II): What Do Ancient Teeth Reveal About Us?

Toothy Traces (Part II): What Do Ancient Teeth Reveal About Us?

In the field of archaeology, state-of-the-art technology, and a focus on ancient teeth, is shedding new light on how our ancestors lived and survived. 

According to Smithsonian, recent advancements now permit scientists to discern diets, lifestyles and evolutionary patterns using teeth. The tech has produced a mouthful of new insights.

“You know my methods, Watson”  

Specifically, modern machinery has dramatically increased the ability to detect and analyze prehistoric foodstuffs, till now one of the most challenging archaeological procedures. The revolutionary ART (Artificial Resynthesis Technology) System, developed by the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanicals, has, for example, made it significantly easier for researchers to uncover the diets of those living in the Mesolithic Croatian Peninsula

ART’s role is to simulate human chewing, showing how friction caused by different foods affect our teeth. For example, previous notions about carnivorous humanoids, such as the Neanderthals, was challenged by the realization that chewing on meat left relatively no micro-wear marks or abrasions on enamel – so smoother, less abraded teeth likely belonged to meat eaters. 

By analyzing their teeth, scientists are also realizing just how good an indicator diets are at determining whether a fossil that’s been discovered is even human in the first place. In China’s Tibetan Plateau, fossils dating back to around 160,000 years ago contained teeth with significant levels of collagen, according to Nature.com. Its chemical structure was a “single amino-acid variant”, which is not present in modern humans or Neanderthals. Researchers were able to determine that the bones actually belonged to a rare hominin group known as the Denisovans, who were scarcely populated across modern day Asia. Most importantly, this marked the first time that a hominid had been categorized using only proteins. Teeth offered clues that led to a major discovery.

The “Lucy” skeleton belongs to the species, Australopithecus afarensis. Chemical analysis of her teeth revealed that hominins ate a more diverse diet than their primate cousins.

“Which Way Did They Go, Boss?”

Health and diet are not the only factors to assess when analyzing fossils. Migration and behavior are two more areas now possible to track through dental studies. In 2015, ancient teeth found in southern China revealed an interesting fact: humans had been in Asia for anywhere between 80 and 120 thousand years, a much later date than what had been commonly thought.

With such information packed into a single chomper, it stands to reason that many theories about our ancestors can be challenged through the study of teeth.

Even plaque can be a tool in unearthing prehistoric mysteries. Chemical studies on the plaque of Polynesians was able to reveal migration from one island to another. How? By looking at strontium isotopes. If the groundwater that absorbed into the molars changed, it was a good sign that the individual had traveled a long distance.

Behavior-wise, how humans were using their teeth was often a result of their nearby environment. Using teeth for grasping and clamping down was often a result of living in a cold, barren area, where meat was one of the few available food sources. However, warmer areas gave way to using teeth to soften fibers, help sharpen tools, and perform other tasks. 

The teeth make all the difference.

Attempting to understand prehistoric humans is a difficult and often unrewarding job – ever-expanding modern technology has enabled scientists to dive progressively deeper into what their lives were like. So teeth, a part of the body used so frequently by humans to interact with their environments, are the perfect ones to study in order to trace their diet, health, common behavior, migratory practices and many more. Hopefully, their findings will help us better understand how we got here, and where we are going. 

One last thing: Take care of your own teeth and see your dentist regularly – you never know who might discover them a thousand years from now – and making a good impression is so important!

Contributed by: Bryan Armetta
Edited by: Clifford S. Yurman

The Serious/Funny Side of Snoring

The Serious/Funny Side of Snoring

Our editors debated which would be better – a post covering the funny side of snoring, or a post covering the serious side of snoring. Then they said, “why not both?” Our editors are so smart!

read more
How Smile Rejuvenation Can Make You Look Younger!

How Smile Rejuvenation Can Make You Look Younger!

Have you seen recent photographs of yourself and wondered, “Who’s that old person?”

Do you see that the lower third of your face is starting to wrinkle, sag or form jowls? Your immediate reaction may be that the only option you have for restoring your youthful appearance is “to have some work done” – but before you book that plastic surgery consult, why not drop by your dentist’s office first? It may sound crazy, but your sunken, aged face could be caused by none other than your teeth!

The Effects of Tooth Wear and Tear

It’s no surprise that teeth wear down naturally with age. This shortening/flattening of the teeth can make your upper and lower jaws move closer together when at rest. As a result, your nose and chin are closer together as well, which compresses the appearance of the lower portion of your face. When this happens, your lips and cheeks may look collapsed, and wrinkles will form around your mouth.

If you also have bruxism, your teeth will wear even faster than they do during the normal aging process. Bruxism is a fancy word for teeth grinding, often while you sleep, and it can make you look old before your time.

Worn or damaged teeth not only affect your appearance, they also contribute to an improper bite. Teeth that do not meet properly when you bite makes eating difficult, and they also lead to more episodes of unconscious teeth grinding, creating a vicious cycle of improper oral function and bruxism.

Non-Surgical Face-Lift!

In cases of worn teeth, a few simple dental procedures can make you look as if you’ve had a face-lift. By restoring the length of your teeth and ensuring that they are properly aligned when you bite and chew, the collapsed appearance of your lower face may very well disappear. Not only will your lips and cheeks appear fuller and more youthful with the right support, your bite will also feel more comfortable and function optimally.

Treatments To Rejuvenate Your Smile

To perform a smile rejuvenation, your dentist will first determine if you have bruxism or the related condition, TMJ disorder, which affects jaw joint functioning and can contribute to a misaligned bite. Treatment for these conditions will likely include the use of a night guard or occlusal splint to hold the jaw in the proper position and protect the teeth from the forces of clenching and grinding.

To rebuild the structure of teeth that are damaged due to aging or bruxism, your dentist will place either porcelain veneers or crowns on your teeth.

Veneers are thin porcelain laminates placed on the front teeth and can transform their length, shape and color.

Crowns, which can be constructed from a variety of materials, such as white porcelain that matches surrounding teeth, cover the entire tooth and are most often used on molars.

Sometimes teeth are so worn that they experience severe decay and cannot be saved. In such cases, your dentist will extract the tooth and replace it with a dental implant, which consists of an artificial tooth root topped off with a natural-looking porcelain restoration.

Whatever treatments are used, your smile rejuvenation will not only improve the appearance of your facial structure but also turn back the clock by giving you a brighter, youthful-looking face. See your dentist today!

Toothy Traces (Part II): What Do Ancient Teeth Reveal About Us?

Toothy Traces (Part II): What Do Ancient Teeth Reveal About Us?

In the field of archaeology, state-of-the-art technology, and a focus on ancient teeth, is shedding new light on how our ancestors lived and survived. 

According to Smithsonian, recent advancements now permit scientists to discern diets, lifestyles and evolutionary patterns using teeth. The tech has produced a mouthful of new insights.

“You know my methods, Watson”  

Specifically, modern machinery has dramatically increased the ability to detect and analyze prehistoric foodstuffs, till now one of the most challenging archaeological procedures. The revolutionary ART (Artificial Resynthesis Technology) System, developed by the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanicals, has, for example, made it significantly easier for researchers to uncover the diets of those living in the Mesolithic Croatian Peninsula

ART’s role is to simulate human chewing, showing how friction caused by different foods affect our teeth. For example, previous notions about carnivorous humanoids, such as the Neanderthals, was challenged by the realization that chewing on meat left relatively no micro-wear marks or abrasions on enamel – so smoother, less abraded teeth likely belonged to meat eaters. 

By analyzing their teeth, scientists are also realizing just how good an indicator diets are at determining whether a fossil that’s been discovered is even human in the first place. In China’s Tibetan Plateau, fossils dating back to around 160,000 years ago contained teeth with significant levels of collagen, according to Nature.com. Its chemical structure was a “single amino-acid variant”, which is not present in modern humans or Neanderthals. Researchers were able to determine that the bones actually belonged to a rare hominin group known as the Denisovans, who were scarcely populated across modern day Asia. Most importantly, this marked the first time that a hominid had been categorized using only proteins. Teeth offered clues that led to a major discovery.

The “Lucy” skeleton belongs to the species, Australopithecus afarensis. Chemical analysis of her teeth revealed that hominins ate a more diverse diet than their primate cousins.

“Which Way Did They Go, Boss?”

Health and diet are not the only factors to assess when analyzing fossils. Migration and behavior are two more areas now possible to track through dental studies. In 2015, ancient teeth found in southern China revealed an interesting fact: humans had been in Asia for anywhere between 80 and 120 thousand years, a much later date than what had been commonly thought.

With such information packed into a single chomper, it stands to reason that many theories about our ancestors can be challenged through the study of teeth.

Even plaque can be a tool in unearthing prehistoric mysteries. Chemical studies on the plaque of Polynesians was able to reveal migration from one island to another. How? By looking at strontium isotopes. If the groundwater that absorbed into the molars changed, it was a good sign that the individual had traveled a long distance.

Behavior-wise, how humans were using their teeth was often a result of their nearby environment. Using teeth for grasping and clamping down was often a result of living in a cold, barren area, where meat was one of the few available food sources. However, warmer areas gave way to using teeth to soften fibers, help sharpen tools, and perform other tasks. 

The teeth make all the difference.

Attempting to understand prehistoric humans is a difficult and often unrewarding job – ever-expanding modern technology has enabled scientists to dive progressively deeper into what their lives were like. So teeth, a part of the body used so frequently by humans to interact with their environments, are the perfect ones to study in order to trace their diet, health, common behavior, migratory practices and many more. Hopefully, their findings will help us better understand how we got here, and where we are going. 

One last thing: Take care of your own teeth and see your dentist regularly – you never know who might discover them a thousand years from now – and making a good impression is so important!

Contributed by: Bryan Armetta
Edited by: Clifford S. Yurman

The Serious/Funny Side of Snoring

The Serious/Funny Side of Snoring

Our editors debated which would be better – a post covering the funny side of snoring, or a post covering the serious side of snoring. Then they said, “why not both?” Our editors are so smart!

read more

TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Sunday 12:58 AMWe’re currently closed, but please do contact us online, or leave a message. Thank you!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
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WE’RE HERE FOR YOU

PATIENT CORNER

MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

TIMES TO SMILE

John J. Kelly, DDS

It's Sunday 12:58 AMWe’re currently closed, but please do contact us online, or leave a message. Thank you!

Monday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Tuesday8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
Wednesday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
Thursday7:00 AM — 4:00 PM
FridayClosed
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

MEET DR. JOHN J. KELLY

Chicago dentist, John J. Kelly, DDS, practices Restorative and Cosmetic Dentistry at his Chicago dental office in Edgebrook.

He delivers a wide range of dental therapeutics, in addition to treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing, including Sleep Apnea, Child Facial Development issues and TMJ/Jaw Pain. MORE ON DR. KELLY

PATIENT CORNER

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU

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